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    • Five Tips For Thriving At Home With Kids During Self-Isolation

      Bored kids are rarely easy to manage. And if kids are attempting to run the place, self-isolation could be a nightmare for both kids and parents alike. But alternatively self-isolating with kids at home could be a time when you can build closer relationships and create great memories... if you're smart about it. It could be a bit like going camping and having weeks of wet weather. Not what you planned, but you can still make the best of it and have fun, just being together. During this pandemic, rarely being able to leave the house limits what you can do to break up the monotony for your kids. But some of us can relate. I can remember having 25 new preschoolers starting a new year with me during three weeks of rain. And I knew if I didn't keep them happy and engaged, those who were inclined to be challenging, would be all over me. Those who were likely to test their parents, were also inclined to test me. So why didn't they? Or if they did, why didn't they continue to do so. Simply put, children got less attention for being difficult and there was so much more in it for them to do the right thing. I always had heaps of interesting things to do so it was more fun to cooperate. I wanted them to be positive about learning so I focused on every positive I could find about their efforts to learn. e.g. When teaching Year 1 I focused on the best sentence written on their page and explained why that was particularly good. That identified what quality work was. And as a result I got better quality work... For younger kids, it may be as simple as commenting on the best letter formation. E.g. straight backs on letters of equal size. So if you're stuck at home and there are generally kids screaming and running around the place it's likely they may not have enough to do. And it can increase the overall levels of stress in the household. But with a little planning you could turn what is currently a difficult time into a positive time with your kids. One where you build quality relationships rather than be saddened by them. Improvements can be made with the introduction of: simple routines: Kids love predictability. They like to know things like after an activity is completed there will hygiene then a snack break. After less stimulating activities there will be something more exciting. the provision of interesting things to do: Kids love to be actively engaged learners. Go to Things to Do With Kids While Self-Isolating At Home During Pandemic: https://www.best-parenting-advice.com/things-to-do-with-kids-during-pande boundaries for behaviour: Kids need clear boundaries so they know how to behave (e.g. using inside voices, using walking feet inside, saying please and thank you all keeps the tone of the house calm and relationships smooth.) Expectations need to be discussed ahead of time so kids know exactly what's expected. e.g If they choose to be difficult and not complete school tasks the natural consequences would be they'd miss out on privileges; having to use the time they should have used earlier, to complete work. noticing the positive: Kids crave attention. You are wise to give it to them for doing the right thing. By noticing the good in any of us, it makes us feel good about ourselves, regardless of how old we are. Our children love to know we see the best in them. consistent expectations. Kids need to know you're reliable. If you're happy and funny one day, yet losing it the next, it unnerves kids. It makes them more on edge and the tone of the home more stressful. There is an excellent article on this site called 6 Steps for Improving Behaviour that may assist you. Go to https://www.best-parenting-advice.com/6-steps-for-managing-behaviour-well This pandemic can provide an opportunity to build positive relationships and happy memories with your children. And it's perfectly fine for you to still expect some time to yourself. The happier your children are, and the better they feel about themselves, the more likely they are to give it to you. Self-isolation at home may provide you time to lead your family into more cooperative, calmer ways of relating so that your home is a happy one. If you're home schooling remember: You're attempting to create a positive attitude to learning for life. Having high pressure to complete an activity, to an adult standard, may not be conducive to a positive attitude. And if your child is not behaving well it's okay to say to them. "I'm not being a good parent if I let you think it's okay to behave like that. We both know you're so much better than that... Are you having trouble with something? Can I help you?" There are 20 articles on behaviour management on Best Parenting Advice.com that can help you if you're having trouble. Check them out. Fond regards, Deb Arthurs

    • How Do Kids Feel: Australia is Burning

      In addition to the Aussie fire crisis our kids may also be being exposed to a media storm of epic proportions. And why can this be an issue for children? As just one example: I can remember how terrified a well-adjusted and happy little boy named 'Jim' became, for what appeared to be, no apparent reason. Jim knew us, had settled well. Yet when his mum was ready to leave for work, he became absolutely frantic. I was deeply concerned by the change, because it was marked. I sat with him and played. And while we played he chatted. I didn't probe. I just let the conversation evolve and progress around the issue. When I eventually asked him if something had happened to make him sad he was surprised. It turned out he was really happy at preschool. But he didn't want his mum to go to work. His exact words were "...because mum works in a high building. And planes fly into high buildings.' I was stunned. And for the first time I saw the horror of 9/11 through a child's eyes. How many times were children exposed to images of planes flying into tall buildings. Likely twenty, thirty, fifty, maybe a hundred. Over years, maybe even more. I recall in just one news broadcast, the same disturbing footage being shown repeatedly from different angles: many promos, multiple images & repeated recaps. Yet again, Australian children are being exposed to repeated trauma, vicariously. But this time it's much closer to home: The Australian bush fire crisis. Children watch their parent's faces fill with concern, as they listen to yet another T.V. update. Australia is burning. It's been on every news channel since late September. And again I wonder just how many traumatic images Australian children have been exposed to. They may have seen or heard about: koalas being burnt and trying to escape, someone's dad dying while fighting a fire, midday looking like midnight, a funeral of another dad who died fighting a fire, exploding gas tanks, upturned fire trucks, streets of shops turned to blackened skeletons and twisted metal, volleys of embers hurled towards firefighters, fire tornadoes, people crying night after night after night after they've lost their homes to fire. And walls and walls and walls of flames and black billowing smoke that blocks out the sun. It's distressing for many adults to watch. Many of our elderly are frightened. And I really hope parents limit their children's exposure to some of the disturbing coverage being aired at the moment. And take the time to reassure their children. Something to consider is, children who watch these broadcasts know they have little or no ability to do anything to stop the fires. As a result they can feel scared. Powerless. And sadly, even anxious. Children can tell their parents are worried. But based on what I did last time, (with the children who were concerned by 9/11,) I found it's possible to help them feel less empowered and still feel hope. I began by talking to the whole school assembly and explained that regardless of what happens in life we have the capacity to work within our own circle of influence to make it better. We discussed the concept of paying it forward and doing something good and not expecting anything in return. For example: Most of the children knew there had been people who hijacked planes and flew them into buildings. But I explained that children had their own power, not to be like them. They could choose instead to be be kind, thoughtful and helpful. We talked about the things all of us could do to make our world a better place. Kids embraced the concept. Many told me about their good deeds over months. Some of the classes recorded their kind acts. And through this, the children felt a little more positive and less powerless. They focused on what they could do, one small act at a time, to make things better again. Is it possible, by embracing kindness and doing something active about it, this could also help our children deal with this bush fire crisis without feeling overwhelmed? Initially children could: give pocket money to welfare agencies and animal welfare agencies help at a charity distribution centre. Even young children like to help sort items write a letter of thanks to their local fire fighters, police, ambulance personnel turn off electrical appliances they're not using (such as the T.V.) so more power is available, because the system could be under stress And I'm sure you have many more ideas. But long term children might choose to address some of the climate change issues which are bothering many of them: They could: start a bottle drive, and donate the money from recycled bottles to the RFS use refillable drink bottles to take their own water rather than buying bottled drinks be the person to remember the reusable bags at the supermarket rather than buying new ones not use straws give some of their good quality toys they've outgrown to charity, rather than leave them unused (if they're with you,) they could pick up pieces of plastic they find in the environment e.g. while walking along the beach, or through the park, etc NOTE: You will need to educate your child about the dangers of glass, needles and other unsafe items and supervise them to ensure their safety contact their local sustainable neighbourhood group to see if they might create an awareness campaign in their community walk to school rather than drive, or alternatively use public transport instead of the family vehicle create a dialogue with you about what your family is actively doing to help prevent climate change and to help look after our earth recycle things they use (lunch packaging, gift packaging, etc) You'll likely be able to think of many other things your child can do to make them feel more hopeful and in control of their future again. Perhaps it may have a bigger positive impact, if they see those they respect (their parents, teachers, coaches, etc) leading by example. This disaster needs all Australians to work together. All we can do as individuals, is work within our own circles of influence. And encourage others to do the same. It's often not until some time later, when a child starts to exhibit depression, or anxiety symptoms, that the cumulative effect of stress may be realized. My hope is to make you aware of what can be going on, so you can inspire hope. This in turn may prevent your child feeling less empowered about their future. You might like to check out: Setting Up Teenagers to Succeed. Just click on the image of the boy on the skateboard. Regards Deb Disclaimer: Jim is not the real name of the student concerned. All views and advice are written from the perspective of what worked for me. This does not mean that it will necessarily work for you or your children. If you have concerns about your child experiencing levels of depression or anxiety consult your medical practitioner.

    • Five Tips For Thriving At Home With Kids During Self-Isolation

      Bored kids are rarely easy to manage. And if kids are attempting to run the place, self-isolation could be a nightmare for both kids and parents alike. But alternatively self-isolating with kids at home could be a time when you can build closer relationships and create great memories... if you're smart about it. It could be a bit like going camping and having weeks of wet weather. Not what you planned, but you can still make the best of it and have fun, just being together. During this pandemic, rarely being able to leave the house limits what you can do to break up the monotony for your kids. But some of us can relate. I can remember having 25 new preschoolers starting a new year with me during three weeks of rain. And I knew if I didn't keep them happy and engaged, those who were inclined to be challenging, would be all over me. Those who were likely to test their parents, were also inclined to test me. So why didn't they? Or if they did, why didn't they continue to do so. Simply put, children got less attention for being difficult and there was so much more in it for them to do the right thing. I always had heaps of interesting things to do so it was more fun to cooperate. I wanted them to be positive about learning so I focused on every positive I could find about their efforts to learn. e.g. I focused on the best sentence written on their page and explained why that was particularly good. That identified what quality work was. And as a result I got better quality work... For younger kids, it may be as simple as commenting on the best letter formation. E.g. straight backs on letters of equal size. So if you're stuck at home and there are generally kids screaming and running around the place it's likely they may not have enough to do. And it can increase the overall levels of stress in the household. But with a little planning you could turn what is currently a difficult time into a positive time with your kids. One where you build your relationships rather than be saddened by them. Improvements can be made with the introduction of: simple routines: Kids love predictability. They like to know things like after an activity is completed there will hygiene then a snack break. After less stimulating activities there will be something more exciting. the provision of interesting things to do: Kids love to be actively engaged learners. Go to Things to Do With Kids While Self-Isolating At Home During Pandemic: https://www.best-parenting-advice.com/things-to-do-with-kids-during-pande boundaries for behaviour: Kids need clear boundaries so they know how to behave (e.g. using inside voices, using walking feet inside, saying please and thank you all keeps the tone of the house calm and relationships smooth.) Expectations need to be discussed ahead of time so kids know exactly what's expected. e.g If they choose to be difficult and not complete school tasks the natural consequences would be they'd miss out on privileges; having to use the time they should have used earlier, to complete work. noticing the positive: Kids crave attention. You are wise to give it to them for doing the right thing. By noticing the good in any of us, it makes us feel good about ourselves, regardless of how old we are. Our children love to know we see the best in them. consistent expectations. Kids need to know you're reliable. If you're happy and funny one day, yet losing it the next, it unnerves kids. It makes them more on edge and the tone of the home more stressful. There is an excellent article on this site called 6 Steps for Improving Behaviour that may assist you. Go to https://www.best-parenting-advice.com/6-steps-for-managing-behaviour-well This pandemic can provide an opportunity to build positive relationships and happy memories with your children. It's perfectly fine for you to still expect some time to yourself. And the happier your children are, and the better they feel about themselves, the more likely they are to give it to you. Self-isolation at home may provide you the time to lead your family into more cooperative, calmer ways of relating so that your home is a happy one. If you're home schooling remember: You're attempting to create a positive attitude to learning for life. Having high pressure to complete an activity, to an adult standard, may not be conducive to a positive attitude. And if your child is not behaving well it's okay to say to them. "I'm not being a good parent if I let you think it's okay to behave like that. We both know you're so much better than that... Are you having trouble with something? Can I help you?" There are 20 articles on behaviour management on Best Parenting Advice.com that can help you if you're having trouble. Check them out. Fond regards, Deb Arthurs

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    • WHAT SUCCESSFUL FAMILIES DO | Best Parenting Advice: Raising kids. What works?

      BEST STARTS FOR KIDS What Successful Families Do Step by Step Parenting Tips 1 Have you ever wondered why some families succeed while others struggle? What do really successful families do differently? ​ Their secret is simple. They don't beat themselves up, for what they didn't get done. They congratulate themselves, for what they do right. Successful parents have their time prioritised according to what their values deem is most important. Then they get those things done. Successful parents concentrate on 'the important' over 'the urgent.' They develop positive parenting habits, or routines, that back up their values. Every time they do what they believe in their hearts is the 'right' thing, they congratulate themselves. Successful parents celebrate what they did well... How good is it to feel good about your parenting. ​ Successful parents behave their way to success through their supportive habits. Now you're likely pretty successful at parenting already.... Right? And you may just be looking for a few ideas on how to further improve; especially with making your behaviour consistent. I've found if you want to 'feel' like a successful parent, including 'little' habits into what you're already doing well, or tweaking what you're already doing, may further increase your success over time. You will increase your success if you immediately mentally congratulate yourself every time you do what you believe you should do. And if you take the extra step of recording it, you'll realise just how great you really are. ​ ​ These habits could be simple things like: Praising specific aspects of children's behaviour, so your child learns exactly what makes a behaviour good. (e.g. aiming for a person's chest when passing a footy.) ​ Looking at your children when they speak to you; so you know when they're listening, and they know they're important to you ​ . Having predictable routines: meal times, teeth cleaning, bed times, so your kids know what comes next. It makes them feel safe, helps them learn to cooperate & become more independent You're busy right... But could you possibly ease in just one new, easy positive habit? Your habits will determine your future. quote by Jack Canfield ​ ...But your habits can also determine your children's futures. Simple Positive Habits Support Success. Below is an ideas bank for different areas that I've used successfully. But I'm sure you can think of others that may be more appropriate for you. You may notice how much I've tried to make doing the right thing easier for myself: ​ Parenting Put a routine chart on the fridge so kids know what they've got to do in the morning Make chores into fun games. e.g. tidying up before the bomb goes off... Little kids love sweeping leaves off a path so get them a tiny broom. Use egg timers for turn taking. You can buy sets in three, five, ten minute internals. Great for avoiding arguments Make a chart of what goes in each child's bag & get them to pack it (You will need to check, especially at the beginning.) Reward every improvement, and especially when they get it all right. Have at least half a day a week when you do something fun together as a family. e.g. picnic, park, beach, zoo, walk, adventure, etc Put your phone in a drawer for 10% of each day between 5:30 and 8:10. That's family time. Add an opportunity for learning about mathematics incidentally e.g. while cooking, gardening, building Home Organisation If kid's sport is cancelled have a cooking day. Make heaps of meals and freeze them: curries, spaghetti, Mex, etc. Learn more: Make up a permanent shopping list of everything and fluoro the items you need to buy linked to your menu Establish a fortnightly repeating menu based on your time schedule. e.g. On days you arrive home late use a pre-made frozen meal Put frozen pre-made meals into the fridge to thaw before you leave for work, then you only need to cook rice or pasta.. 15 minutes and dinner is ready. Pack schoolbags the night before, ready for lunches to be added the next morning Values Support Habits ...And Habits Support Success Successful Parents are generally guided by their values/principles. They usually: ​ Have a strong lifetime-commitment to building positive family relationships ​ Lead by example ​ Value and support health and education ​ Interact respectfully and honestly ​ Are trustworthy, capable and cooperative ​ Have long-term goals for their children to attain success and independence ​ Are understanding, tolerant and forgiving ​ Model resilience ​ Expect the best. Yet plan for the worst. ​ 2. Parents lead by example and: Set high expectations Provide guiding feedback Respond to individual needs Ensure guide child behaviour clear boundaries Remain involved as children grow These parents are: more willing to negotiate around rules factor in individual maturity levels and respond flexibly when the need arises ​ ​ The best thing you can spend on your kids, is time. quote by Arnold Glasgow ​ 5. It's expected that children will make mistakes as a part of learning. Successful parents use it as an opportunity to help develop resilience. ​ Parents remain calm, look at opportunities to make amends when mistakes occur and find ways to resolve problems Successful parents model ways of overcoming difficulties or failures themselves... by adapting Parents show by example, that even large difficulties can be overcome with time and a plan ​ ​ ​ 7. Successful parents use positive expectation & routines to provide a safe framework to support children. They make time to have fun together. ​ as a family is planned for, and prioritised. e.g. playing family games together, going on holidays together, etc Quality time Time is ideally spent together on a daily basis: eating together, reading at night, etc provide clear expectations of daily and/or weekly responsibilities for children. This helps scaffold personal independence Routines Parents have routines in place that helps support the effective running of the household Consequences for less desirable behaviour are usually natural ones. Go to to learn more. Why Use Natural Consequences? ​ One of the simplest habits I introduced to help maintain my health, was flossing my teeth immediately after I finished my evening meal. ​ Obviously, to care for our teeth flossing is important. But the biggest difference for me was, I didn't snack after my evening meal once my teeth were clean... And over time this reduced my weight. A one-minute habit transformed what was a problem time of day for me. Share this page with a friend ​ For more strategies to support child & family success the following articles may be useful: ​ Just linking one new habit to an existing habit you're already doing well, will stick, if you instantly reward it. If you make yourself feel really good for doing it, 'every' time and especially at the beginning, the new behaviour will continue. e.g. Encourage kids to: unpack their school bags as soon as they walk through the door, put lunchboxes in the dishwasher and get out homework. Reward: Praise them plus give them something tangible (that you were going to give them anyway) like a healthy snack after school. Then immediately reward yourself for sticking to your values of: supplying healthy food, helping develop your child's independence and organizational skills, having a routine that supports family cooperation, etc. This should make you feel really good about your parenting ability. ​ You could put a counter in a jar every time you act consistently to your belief system... Then you'll begin to notice the many positive things you're doing, rather than the things you didn't get to. ​ Adding even one tiny positive habit can make a massive difference to your children's success because 'positive effects accumulate over time.' For example... Did you know? ​ That by developing that one tiny habit of spending five minutes a day reading, just one book a day to your child, (from the age of six months, until they were six,) your child will have been exposed to around a million more words than if you didn't. Can you imagine how much difference that could make to your child's learning ability & confidence starting school? ​ And because these words are in context, your child wouldn't only increase their vocabulary, they'll also improve their comprehension, their grammar, their ability to rhyme plus their ability to predict what comes next by knowing what makes sense. They'll learn reading and writing conventions which will help later with their own reading and writing. Things like: reading from left to right, return sweeping to the next line, reading from the top to the bottom of a page, what a full stop is and means, what a question mark is and means, etc Healthy Lifestyle Put exercise clothes out ready for morning exercise Exercise first thing, that way despite how busy you are, every day has something in it for you Make up 2 or 3 salads at a time for lunches. That way if you need a snack, you have a salad ready If you want to watch the t.v. do a couple of minutes of running/marching on the spot before you watch it Floss your teeth immediately after your evening meal (that way you don't eat after dinner. If you do it first when you clean your teeth before bed, your flossing is already done Do pelvic floor exercises while you clean your teeth Ensure healthy sleep habits for everyone Child Education Establish reading a book a day from when children are very young Practise phonics for two minutes every school day with developing readers. Check out the Fun Phonics Game . It's free. Help your child learn the 100 Most Used Words. They make up 50% of everything they'll need to read or write When children are in infants school have them read to you for ten minutes every school day. It's one of the greatest things you can do for them Set up an afternoon routine: snack, homework, relaxation time after homework If you're buying your child a gift, buy a book on a subject your child is passionate about Play turn taking learning games like: Memory, Bingo, Yahtzee, Guess Who, Monopoly, Free Fun Maths Games Values are personal. Yet as loving parents, it's interesting how many values we share. You'll likely have a lot of these values already. But when you expand them out, they can often look like this: ​ ​ 1. Successful parents have a sense of higher purpose related to their family. Family is a priority for them. Parents maintain a strong lifelong commitment to their children's success. ​ They have a positive ongoing relationship with their partner (regardless of whether they live together or not. E.g. They choose to love their children more than hate an ex-partner.) These parents balance the 'me' and 'we' aspects of family well, devoting time to both. They're willing to spend the time necessary to with their children. build quality relationships ​ 3. Interactions are respectful. Dialogue is open, honest, age appropriate and supports understanding. Ge nuine trust and co-operation occurs between parents; and between children and parents. ​ Parents model respect, kindness and co-operation in their every day interactions. Children are encouraged to have good social skills. These families often have regular extended family contact and involve in their community. Parents have fun with their kids and include them in socializing. ​ Parents express appreciation and gratitude. Every individual is valued for what they contribute to the family. ​ 4. Successful parents value their own health and well being, evidenced by: providing regular healthy meals, regular exercise and appropriate levels of sleep Because of the parent's own they're good role models for their children. healthy lifestyles They're also willing to accept, that different children may have different interests, and/or activity needs. ​ ​ ​ 6. Successful parents maintain a big picture perspective. They plan ahead, aware they're trying to raise independent, responsible, capable, empathetic adults. ​ Parents expose their children to different ideas, experiences and cultures, to widen their perspective Parents give children their own responsibilities and expect them to fulfill these commitments They consistently link privileges to age and maturity P arents increase the child's opportunities for autonomy as they mature. ​ ​ Any of us who have joined the parenting club know how hard it can be. Some days can be particularly challenging. ​ But the more you automate the positive parenting habits you have, the easier it is to maintain, even on difficult days. And the better habits you have, the greater cumulative success you'll achieve. If someone said to me by adopting the strategies on the link below I'd be able to: get three years of my life back eat healthier plus pay off my mortgage almost ten years earlier I wouldn't have believed them. But this is exactly what happened when I adopted the practical tips below. It worked so well for us, I can't tell you how many times I've been asked for this information. ​ This is one of our most popular pages on Best Parenting Advice.com because it shows practical ways that really help make family life easier, heaps less expensive and more enjoyable: Time, Money and Health Savers Savers for Healthy Meals Creating Strength Based Kids Creating strength based kids Best Ways of Developing Language Best Ways of Developing Language Behaviour Strategies That Work Behaviour Strategies That Work What is Most Important in Life? What is most important in life Setting up a Repeating Menu Time savers for Healthy Meals Choosing Gratitude Not Entitlement A girl kissing her father Show More Back to Top Best Parenting Advice.com is a high quality parenting website designed with child and family success in mind. It highlights what successful parents do differently to those who struggle. Best Parenting advice.com provides free online resources for busy parents who want the best practical advice on: how to give kids a best start in life, better tips for parenting toddlers, effective child rearing strategies, behaviour management tips, successful goal setting and organizational strategies for successful families, easy family dinner recipes, self-care tips for time-poor parents and free kids learning games. The aim of Best Parenting Advice.com is to provide quality practical parenting tips and advice to best help children and families succeed, using the convenience of a website. ​ This website provides examples of what worked for me over decades and you are welcome to use these ideas as you see fit but you do so at your own risk. Best Parenting Advice.com does not provide any guarantee that this information will work in every circumstance with every family or with every child. It is your responsibility as a user of this website to ensure that you adhere to any recommended safety suggestions either implicit or explicit on this site and supervise your children while playing any games suggested. Similarly users of this website are advised to follow any recommendations for seeking professional advice as all information on this site is generic. Best Parenting Advice.com is an independent website and is not affiliated with any other groups, clubs, religious organizations or educational systems. Best parenting takes time. The best parenting advice ever is simple: Do your best, don't give up and love your children, no matter what.

    • 4 Ways to Help Develop Co-operative Kids | Best Parenting Advice & Better Tips

      BEST STARTS FOR KIDS 4 Ways to Develop Cooperative Kids 1. Catch Kids Being Good I've taught thousands of children over decades from babies through to thirteen year olds and I found there was one constant across all age groups. What I gave attention to, I got more of. ​ When I noticed children being good I experienced less behaviour problems. There was simply more in it for them by being co-operative. ​ I'm still surprised when, if two young kids are playing well together, a parent will say nothing until they begin to argue. ​ ​ If there's no attention for being good, but instant attention received for doing something wrong, what's being reinforced? ​ Children crave your attention and will do what they can to get it. Positive attention builds your relationship, negative attention damages it. 3. Model Cooperative Behaviour Yourself When my kids were young we had one rule in the family and that was 'cooperate.' And it applied equally to the adults. But from when our children were very young we did a lot of every day things together, so we learned to help each other out. Our kids learnt cooperation made it easier for all of us. ​ Then when any chores were done, we got to have fun together. And I made sure we did have fun. ​ We talked about the importance of doing what was asked properly, first time as it saved time in the long run. And out kids learnt it was good to know you had people in your family you could rely on to make life easier. Sometimes we did things that had some risk associated with them, for example surfing and I needed to be able to trust my children. ​ Trust was built upon by increasing responsibilities and privileges, as they were earned. ​ If you build your relationship with a child you have credit points to fall back on if you can't do or give them something they want. It's a great idea to build those credits up while your kids are young. ​ For more ideas on developing positive learning opportunities visit the following links below: Step by Step Parenting Tips 4 (Follow the blue text for tips) Behaviour can improve markedly if you consistently do the following: ​ Watch for your kids 'being good' and comment on exactly what they're doing right. Then they learn what being good actually means ​ Make children aware of boundaries ahead of time, preferably before a negative incident occurs ​ Model cooperative behaviour yourself ​ Spend time building the relationship, by being interested in what your kids are interested in ​ 2. Make Expectations Clear Ahead of Time (Boundaries) e.g. Prior to going into a shopping centre I didn't ever just say "be good." Instead I made it clear (ahead of time) what was expected. Some simple useful rules for shopping: ​ (so only those with you can hear you) Keep your voices low Keep your hands to yourself Stay near me. (Within two steps of me) Explain the better behaved they were the quicker I'd be ​ ​ Set things up for kids to succeed by: ​ Having kids where they can see something interesting. e.g. In the shopping centre a mirror works a treat, toy catalogues also work well Noticing and acknowledging positive behaviours immediately Giving a reward linked to positive behaviour at the end. But by linking it to behaviour, kidslearn there's something in it for them, for being good. Whenever possible, I later addressed each one independently and told them what they'd done to help me and why I appreciated it. And that helped build our relationship. ​ 4. Build Your Relationship ​ Another thing that's really important in encouraging co-operation is paying attention to what's important to a child. ​ I recall a boy I taught who'd had many behaviour problems with previous teachers, and often at home with his mum. But one day I had the good fortune to see him with his little brother; how kind and gentle he was with him. I could tell he adored him. So every morning I asked this often initially sullen boy how his little brother was going... And his face lit up. ​ ​It took probably ten to twenty seconds every day but it transformed this boy's world because he knew someone 'saw him,' and knew what was important to him. His attitude to school and his education improved. And he became a really good kid. ​ We all like to feel somebody notices us. ​ Step 5: Why Proximal Development is so Important for learning ​ Step by Step 5: Next Share this page with a friend Creating Strength Based Kids Creating Strength Based Learners. Girls involved in science and technology. Developing Independent Learners Developing Independent Learners Learning Maths Incidentally Learning maths incidentally through cooking helps kids learn maths literacy aalong with maths concepts Show More Back to Top Best Parenting Advice.com is a high quality parenting website designed with child and family success in mind. It highlights what successful parents do differently to those who struggle. Best Parenting advice.com provides free online resources for busy parents who want the best practical advice on: how to give kids a best start in life, better tips for parenting toddlers, effective child rearing strategies, behaviour management tips, successful goal setting and organizational strategies for successful families, easy family dinner recipes, self-care tips for time-poor parents and free kids learning games. The aim of Best Parenting Advice.com is to provide quality practical parenting tips and advice to best help children and families succeed, using the convenience of a website. ​ This website provides examples of what worked for me over decades and you are welcome to use these ideas as you see fit but you do so at your own risk. Best Parenting Advice.com does not provide any guarantee that this information will work in every circumstance with every family or with every child. It is your responsibility as a user of this website to ensure that you adhere to any recommended safety suggestions either implicit or explicit on this site and supervise your children while playing any games suggested. Similarly users of this website are advised to follow any recommendations for seeking professional advice as all information on this site is generic. Best Parenting Advice.com is an independent website and is not affiliated with any other groups, clubs, religious organizations or educational systems. Best parenting takes time. The best parenting advice ever is simple: Do your best, don't give up and love your children, no matter what.

    • BEHAVIOUR STRATEGIES THAT WORK | Best Parenting Advice.com

      BEST STARTS FOR KIDS Behaviour Strategies That Work Step by Step Parenting Tips 3 (Follow the blue text for tips) It's easier to build strong children than mend broken ones. Adapted quote by Frederick Douglas WHY IS COOPERATIVE BEHAVIOUR SO IMPORTANT? ​ If your child is cooperative he or she will be more likely to experience some of the following: ​ ​ good relationships with parents and siblings feeling like they belong playing regularly with the same children that they like and share interests with social acceptance: being invited by kids to: join in games, birthday parties, sleepovers, etc being listened to and being understood sharing activities that involve trust being exposed to an ever widening social group 'My behaviour is the result of your behaviour.' Priyaank Arora Share this page with a friend Your child's behaviour largely creates his or her world. If they behave well and react positively towards others, others in turn, generally react more positively towards them. A child who behaves poorly can experience being misunderstood, being ignored, or even being socially shunned, especially if they hurt others. ​ While people are often understanding of physical and intellectual disabilities, social disabilities can be less well tolerated. A child's behaviour creates their world. ​ ​ However if your child is uncooperative he or she will be more likely to experience some of the following behaviours: a reluctance to get close, they're a bit too hard social isolation, not being asked to play or worse social shunning, not being asked to birthday parties, social functions, etc negative consequences or discipline poor learning due to their lack of listening or concentration which can impact on school results being misunderstood getting a negative reputation, increasing the difficulty in being accepted by good role models ​ Step 4: How to achieve cooperative behaviour in four easy steps. Step By Step 4: Next For information on improving over 20 behaviour issues go to the following links: Establishing Sleep Routines Establishing Sleep Routines 4 Ways to Develop Cooperative Kids 4 ways to develop cooperative kids. Child helping her mother do the shopping. Tool Kit 1: Curbing Disrespect Curbing Disrespect Tool Kit 2: How to Set Boundaries How to set boundaries for behaviour Sibling Rivalry Solutions Overcoming sibling rivalry Boundaries Help Raise Good Kids Setting Boundaries Why Be Consistent? Consistency, Consistency, Consistency Why Spend Postive Time Together? A father playing chess with his son can help create a positive relationship Choosing Gratitude Not Entitlement A girl kissing her father Why Natural Consequences? The Value of Natural Consequences The Value of Routines The value of routines in children's lives. For example, playing soccer. Good Intentions: Bad Results Show More * Managing Behaviour Well Managing Behaviour Well Managing Tantrums Better Tips for Managing Tantrums Overcoming Separation Anxiety Overcoming Separation Anxiety Get a 3 or 4 Year Old to Listen How to Get a 3 or 4 Year Old to Listen Creating Strength Based Kids How to Create Strength Based Kids Developing Independent Learners Developing Independent Learners Show More BLOG: Raising Successful Teenagers Raising teenagers to succeed BLOG: Scared of Your Teenager? BLOG: Kids Dealing With Trauma Blog: Kids Dealing With Trauma Show More Back to Top Best Parenting Advice.com is a high quality parenting website designed with child and family success in mind. It highlights what successful parents do differently to those who struggle. Best Parenting advice.com provides free online resources for busy parents who want the best practical advice on: how to give kids a best start in life, better tips for parenting toddlers, effective child rearing strategies, behaviour management tips, successful goal setting and organizational strategies for successful families, easy family dinner recipes, self-care tips for time-poor parents and free kids learning games. The aim of Best Parenting Advice.com is to provide quality practical parenting tips and advice to best help children and families succeed using the convenience of a website. ​ This website provides examples of what worked for me over decades and you are welcome to use these ideas as you see fit but you do so at your own risk. Best Parenting Advice.com does not provide any guarantee that this information will work in every circumstance with every family or with every child. It is your responsibility as a user of this website to ensure that you adhere to any recommended safety suggestions either implicit or explicit on this site and supervise your children while playing any games suggested. Similarly users of this website are advised to follow any recommendations for seeking professional advice as all information on this site is generic. Best Parenting Advice.com is an independent website and is not affiliated with any other groups, clubs, religious organizations or educational systems. Best parenting takes time. The best parenting advice ever is simple: Do your best, don't give up and love your children, no matter what.

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